Tag Archives: Tibetan Buddhism

Tummo

ICEMANTummo

Tummo (gtum-mo) is a Tibetan word, literally meaning fierce [woman] or inner fire. Tummo may also be rendered in English approximating its phonemic enunciation as ‘Dumo’.

Tummo (Sanskrit: caṇḍālī) is a form of Yoga, found in the Six Yogas of Naropa, Lamdre, Kalachakra and Anuyoga teachings of Tibetan Vajrayana. Tummo originally derives from Indian Vajrayana tradition, including the instruction of the Mahasiddha Krishnacarya and the Hevajra Tantra. The purpose of tummo is to gain control over body processes during the completion stage of ‘highest yoga tantra’ (Anuttarayoga Tantra) or Anuyoga.

 

Practice

After familiarity in trul khor, there is the practice of tummo.

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From Zero Point Origins

Dalai LamaThe Dalai Lama’s Teachings of Tibetan Buddhism
by zeropoints.ca

On the Indestructible Drop within the Heart,
Consciousness as the Mind of Clear Light & the Empty Space Particles

The following notes draw from the Dalai Lama’s book Advice on Dying, and Living a Better Life (2002) his dialogues with Renee Weber and David Bohm in Dialogues with Scientists and Sages (1986) and The Universe in a Single Atom (2005).

In Buddhism, since the definition of “living” refers to sentient beings, consciousness is the primary characteristic of “life.” (2005, p. 106)

We will explore the Dalai Lama’s teaching as most pertain to the investigation of the heart doctrine, the nature of human consciousness as light and the concept of zero point origins.

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Lung – Breath

Tsa rLungLUNG

Lung (Tibetan: rlung) is a word that means ‘wind’ or ‘breath’. It is a key concept in the Vajrayana traditions of Tibetan Buddhism and as such is part of the symbolic ‘twilight language’, used to non-conceptually point to a variety of meanings.

Lung is a concept that is particularly important to understandings of the subtle body and the Three Vajras (body, speech and mind). Tibetan medicine practitioner Dr. Tamdin Sither Bradley provides a summary:

The general description of rLung is that it is a subtle flow of energy and out of the five elements (air, fire, water, earth and space) it is most closely connected with air. However it is not simply the air which we breathe or the wind in our stomachs, it goes much deeper than that. Continue reading

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