Tag Archives: Tarot

12 Common Archetypes

The 12 Common Archetypes
By Carl Golden

The term “archetype” has its origins in ancient Greek. The root words are archein, which means “original or old”; and typos, which means “pattern, model or type”. The combined meaning is an “original pattern” of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are derived, copied, modeled, or emulated.

The psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung, used the concept of archetype in his theory of the human psyche. He believed that universal, mythic characters—archetypes—reside within the collective unconscious of people the world over. Archetypes represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions. Continue reading

A Tarot of Egypt

Shamanic Mysteries of Egypt, Awakening the Healing Power of the Heart
By Nicki Scully & Linda Star Wolf, 2007

The Glossary of the Gods
A Guide to the Sacred Neteru of Ancient Egypt
[Excerpt]

In this glossary we present the neteru in the order that they appear in Shamanic Mysteries of Egypt. The first part of each description is based on our direct phenomenological experience of these powerful deities. We follow our own understanding with a few brief comments on generally accepted history and interpretations for each deity.

0. The Dove: Initiate/Innocence/Trust

The Dove represents the reader as the archetypal principle of the innocent initiate who responds to the call to enter these mysteries. The Dove trusts his or her own inner knowing in the face of the powerful transformational forces encountered on this path. The initiate carries an olive branch as an offering of peace and to honor each of the neteru that are our guides throughout the journey. Continue reading

Tarot and the Tree of Life

Qabalah Tree of LifeFrom The Little Book of Tarot
by R. Pollack (2004)

“No historical evidence exists to back up the claim that Tarot cards derive from the tradition of Jewish mysticism known as Kabbalah (the word means “received doctrine” and implies an oral, or secret, tradition).”

Many Tarot readers […] learn the meanings from a book about Tarot without much thought or concern for where those meanings originated. Kabbalah (or Qabala, the non-Jewish occult version) is where [Tarot comes] from.

Continue reading

Mountain Dove

HawkHawk (Animal Totem)
From Mynzah

Hawk Medicine: – Visionary Power – Guardianship

Cycle of Power: Spring and Fall Equinoxes; New Moon  

Hawk is the Messenger, the Protector and the Visionary of the air. Along with Owl, it has the keenest eyes of the raptors. This powerful bird can awaken the Visionary within you, and lead to your life purpose. It is the Messenger, and when it shows up pay attention: there is always a message coming. Once Hawk shows up, it will stay with you permanently. This powerful bird can awaken your visionary power, open your higher chakras to hear the messages of the Universe and lead you to your life purpose. Also look for Raven to precede or Continue reading

Tarot Symbolism

Emperor ThothChaos and the Psychological Symbolism of the Tarot
By Gerald Schueler, Ph.D. © 1997

Tarot Symbolism

The primary symbolism within the major arcana is as follows:

1. The Fool. The Marseilles deck shows the fool as a court jester holding a baton and standing near a cliff. This symbolism suggests silliness, but perhaps a deliberate silliness. The popular Waite deck is more complex. It shows a young wanderer holding a rose and a walking stick, to which a bag is tied, walking off a cliff. A dog romps at his side. This suggests a happy and carefree attitude that could be dangerous. The Golden Dawn deck shows a naked child holding the reins of a wolf while plucking fruit from a tree. This symbolism suggests that the fool is innocence, and that pure innocence can check animal passions while Continue reading

Psychological Tarot

Emperor ThothChaos and the Psychological Symbolism of the Tarot
By Gerald Schueler, Ph.D. © 1997

Abstract.

The Tarot deck contains archetypal symbols that can be related to the analytical psychology of the Swiss psychologist, Carl Jung. The Tarot deck, especially the major arcana or trump cards, can be used effectively in therapy. The client, with the assistance of the therapist, conducts a reading or uses several cards to tell a story and then discusses possible meanings of the symbols in his or her own words. The therapist then relates the symbolic meanings given by the client to the client’s problem in much the same manner as in Jungian dream analysis. This therapeutic process can be explained by using a chaos model. Using a chaos model of therapy, a period of psychic instability is deliberately induced by the therapist through stimulation of the imagination via the Tarot symbols. Concentration on the Tarot Continue reading

Clubs, Fire, Wands

Tarot Card Meanings – The Wands

The Wands represent energy, inspiration, leadership and achievement.

The Ace of Wands Tarot CardAce of Wands
The Aces represent beginnings, and the Wands represent inspiration and mental energy. This card in particular represents new ideas and plans. Traditionally, creation, invention, energy, birth, adventure.

Reversed
Postponements, deferrals, cancellations. Difficulties getting started. Loss of work or social Continue reading

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