Tag Archives: Life

Four Mulas

LIFE PATH 4
The 4 Life Path is practical and down-to-earth, with strong ideas about right and wrong. You are orderly and organized, systematic and controlled, and you are decisive and methodical, employing a step-by-step rationale approach to problem solving. Once committed, you do not give up easily.

You are not one for get-rich-schemes. Rather you use hard work and long hours while building a business career; you seek to establish a solid foundation. Precise tenacious and persevering, you have a great potential for success, but only after putting out effort, and by overcoming the limitations you so often encounter.

Justice and honesty are sacred to you. You are reliable and dependable, a cornerstone in the community. Though not an idealist, you are willing to work for a better world in the community. However, you can be rigid in your ideas, and sometimes too quick in judging your fellow man. Continue reading

Mercury In the Waters

Mercury in Pisces
By Kelly Fox [Edited]

DO: Carry a pocket calendar to help you make dates and excuses.
DON’T: Run away or hide from your problems.

Pisces Mercury is a highly impressionable and artistic planetary influence that is as slippery as water in your hands. Not particularly prone to logical processes, this period brings forth an imaginative, ethereal quality to your way of thinking, especially useful for artistic endeavors such as music, art, or poetry. You yearn for things that nurture your mind and soul.

Highly sensitive to any kind of criticism, you may want to surround yourself with calming sounds and pleasant pictures. Your dreams may be more vivid than usual, you may find answers from otherworldly realms that you would normally not be open to. Your sensitivity to life around you may be an experience that delights you, or makes you a little apprehensive. Continue reading

Teachings of Ptah Hotep – Papyri

The Teachings of Ptahhotep: The Oldest Book in the World

“First published around 2388 B.C. Fifth Kemetic (Egyptian) Dynasty under the title: Teachings of the Prefect of the City, Dja Ptahhotep ynder the majesty of the king of the South and the North. Assa Djed-Ka-Ra. living eternally forever.”
by Hilliard III Asa G. (Editor), Larry Williams (Editor), Nia Damali (Editor)

…Ptahhotep, instructs the ignorant in the knowledge and in the standards of good speech. A man teaches as he acts… The wise person feeds the soul with what endures, so that it is happy with that person on earth. The wise is known by his good actions. The heart of the wise matches his or her tongue and his or her lips are straight when he or she speaks. The wise have eyes that are made to see and ears that are made to hear what will profit the offspring. The wise is a person who acts with MAAT [truth, justice, order, balance, harmony, righteousness and reciprocity] and is free of falsehood and disorder.
—Ptahotep 2350 B. C. E. Continue reading

Teachings of Ptah Hotep – Modern

The Teachings of Ptah Hotep
From Abibitumi.kasa (Yahmeesh, 2010)

These are instructions by the Mayor of the City who is also the Vizier. His name is Ptahhotep and he serves under Pharoah Assa who lives for all eternity. The mayor of the City, Vizier Ptahhotep, addressed the Supreme Divinity, the Diety as follows:

God upon the crocodiles.” (Reference to Heru) who is sometimes shown standing on two crocodiles. My God, the process of aging brings senility. My mind decays and forgetfulness of the things of yesterday has already begun. Feebleness has come and weakness grows. Childlike one sleeps all day. The eyes are dim and the ears are becoming deaf. The strength is being sapped. The mouth has grown silent and does not speak. The bones ache through and through. Good things now seem evil. The taste is gone. What old age does to people in evil is everything. The nose is clogged and does not breath. It is painful even to stand or to sit. May your servant be authorized to use the status that old age affords, to teach the hearers, so as to tell them the words of those who have listened to the ways of our ancestors, and of those who have listened to the Gods. May I do this for you, so that strife may be banned from among our people, and so that the Two Shores may serve you? Continue reading

Kra Tri – 3

The Universe Has Three Souls
Notes on Translating Akan Culture (1)
By Phil Bartle, Journal of Religion in Africa, Volume XIV, Number 2, 1982, pp 85-114

Part 2

THE CULTURE HAS THREE ELEMENTS

The Twi word usually translated as “culture” is amane, but I soon discovered it meant only traditional customs and rituals. Its meaning is equivalent to high culture of western society: ballet, coronations and the fancy wigs of high court judges; it includes drumming, dancing, etiquette and dress in priests’ and chief’s courts. Culture means all learned human behaviour, high and low. To be learned, culture must be transmitted by symbols, and it is those symbols to which we now turn. Names of people, group identity and behaviour rules such as food avoidances, rites recognising status changes, and the assumed characteristics of colours, are some of these. What is significant in the examination of the ways these signs are used is the reflection of the tripartite cosmology (mentioned above) in these symbols.

Let us begin with labels: how do Akan people get names? Red: Naming is not matronymic in this Continue reading

Kra Tri – 2

The Universe Has Three Souls
Notes on Translating Akan Culture (1)
By Phil Bartle, Journal of Religion in Africa, Volume XIV, Number 2, 1982, pp 85-114

Part 1

Behind each of these three physical elements of the individual there are a series of spiritual personalities or identities which can be seen as parts of increasingly general categories. Behind the flesh and blood is a blood spirit or matrilineal ghost; behind the semen and cleansing fluids is a morality spirit or personality spirit; behind the breath and anima is a destiny soul. Each of these have individual and communal or shared elements, so let us discuss them in turn:

The body belongs to its lineage: so does its “ghost” (saman). When a chief pours a libation on the ancestral stool(s), he is praying to his matrilineal ancestors (Nananom Nsamanfo) and asking them, and, indirectly, God to bring good luck. The word “ghost” is a very poor translation. I prefer to think of saman as “blood spirit” rather than either ghost or soul, because it is different from the other two spirit Continue reading

Yoruba Ori

The Ori
By Philip Neimark

Ori plays an important role for Ifa devotees. The word itself, in Yoruba, has many meanings. It means head, or the apex or highest pinnacle of achievement. In a spiritual sense, the head, as the highest point of the human body, represents Ori. The head of a company or organization is known as Olori, or Ori for short. The supreme being, our single God, is known as Oludumare, another form of the word.

In the human body, Ori has two roles: the physical and the spiritual. The physical functions of Ori will be familiar to us: our brains think, our eyes see, our noses smell, and our ears hear. Our mouths speak and eat and breathe. Our faces are different from all others and provide our physical identities. Our spiritual Ori are themselves subdivided into two elements: Apari-inu and Ori Apere. Apari-inu represents character; Ori Apere represents destiny. An individual may come to Earth with a wonderful destiny, but if he or she comes with bad character, the likelihood of fulfilling that destiny is severely compromised. Character is essentially unchangeable. Destiny is more complex. Continue reading

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