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Tantra

TANTRA

Tantra (Sanskrit: तन्त्र) is the esoteric tradition of Hinduism and Buddhism that co-developed most likely about the middle of 1st millennium CE. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable “text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice”.

In Hinduism, the tantra tradition is associated with its goddess tradition called Shaktism, followed by Shaivism and Vaishnavism. In Buddhism, the Vajrayana tradition is known for its extensive tantra ideas and practices. Tantric Hindu and Buddhist traditions have influenced other religious traditions such as Jainism, Sikhism, the Tibetan Bön tradition, Daoism, and the Japanese Shintō tradition.

The Hindu texts that describe these topics are called Tantras, Āgamas or Samhitās.

Etymology

Tantra (Sanskrit: तन्त्र) literally means “loom, warp, weave”. The connotation of the word tantra to mean an esoteric practice or religious ritualism is a colonial era European invention. The term is based on the Continue reading

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An Introduction to Sacred Geometry

hand-cut-paper-3 - Lisa RoddenSacred Geometry
Introductory Tutorial
by Bruce Rawles

In nature, we find patterns, designs and structures from the most minuscule particles, to expressions of life discernible by human eyes, to the greater cosmos. These inevitably follow geometrical archetypes, which reveal to us the nature of each form and its vibrational resonances. They are also symbolic of the underlying metaphysical principle of the inseparable relationship of the part to the whole. It is this principle of oneness underlying all geometry that permeates the architecture of all form in its myriad diversity. This principle of interconnection, inseparability and union provides us with a continuous reminder of our relationship to the whole, a blueprint for the mind to the sacred foundation of all things created. Continue reading

Chakras – Introduction

Chakra WheelThe concept of chakras features in tantric and yogic traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Chakras are believed to be centers of the body from which a person can collect energy. They are connected to major organs or glands that govern other body parts. Its name derives from the Sanskrit word for “wheel” or “turning”.

Chakras correspond to vital points in the physical body but are generally understood as being part of the “subtle body” which cannot be found through autopsy. While breath channels of yogic practices had already been discussed in the classical Upanishads, it was not until the eighth-century Buddhist Hevajra Tantra and Caryāgiti, that hierarchies of chakras were formally introduced. Continue reading

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