Tag Archives: Energy

Sign of Tehuti

Neter Tehuti (NTR THT)

Appearance: Tehuti is portrayed as a man with the head of an Ibis wearing a crown of the full and crescent moon of the Sun; usually writing.

Western gods: Thot, Hermes

Symbols: Ibis, pen & tablet or papyrus (writing implements), Full and crescent moon, Baboon.

Principle: Resonance – (word/sound/power)
Function: Communication

Western Astrology Dates: 22 August to 23 September

Energies

Tehuti’s powers are concerned with the recording of ‘facts’ or ‘data’ for a cosmic memory that when necessary may reveal its ancient wisdom to whoever calls for it. His energy is said to break through mental barriers; it allows information to become known and secrets or ‘lost’ or ‘forgotten’ ideas to be revealed.

Tehuti assists in the discovery of ‘lost knowledge’ but he communicates more directly with the mind in such a way as is said to ease mental confusion. Continue reading

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Samapathy

100 day meditation challenge 009Day 9 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge
Bodhipaksa, 2013

During my sit I saw a bright white/yellow circle shape flash of light in between my eyebrows (closed eye meditation). The light came rushing at me and filled my vision then vanished. While very interesting, it actually freaked me out a bit. Is there a name for this experience?

I replied, “It’s what we call a samapatti. There are various kinds of these, and some of them involve light, although they can be tactile, proprioceptive, auditory, etc. They usually arise as the mind is starting to settle, and they’re more common in people who are relatively new to meditation. They’re nothing to worry about (they’re common) nor are they something to get very excited about (they’re just “noise” in the system).”

I see samapattis as arising in a few ways: They’re very similar to experiences that people have when they’re exposed to sensory deprivation, which makes me think there’s an element of that going on; the mind is getting quieter, but we’ve not fully tapped into the richness of our experience — especially of the body — and so the mind starts trying to make sense of random neuronal “noise.” One of the most common samapattis is the perception of “swirling lights.” Continue reading

Veil of Dreams

- otomi-charms 2Photo: Otomi protective figure made with amate paper (bark cloth) in Sam Noble Museum, University of Oklahoma

Why Dreaming Is Important
By Robert Moss, 2015

A dream is a wake-up call. It takes us beyond what we already know. Dreams are the language of the soul, and they are experiences of the soul.

There are “big” dreams and “little” dreams, of course. In big dreams, we go traveling and we may receive visitations. We travel across time – into the future and the past – and we travel to other dimensions of reality. This is reflected in the words for “dream” that are used by indigenous people who have retained strong dreaming traditions and respect for dreamers. Among the Makiritare, a shamanic dreaming people of Venezuela, for example, the word for dream is adekato, which means “a journey of the soul”.

Most societies have valued dreams and dreamers for three main reasons. First, they have looked to dreams for contact with a wiser source than the everyday mind – call that God, or Nature, or the Self. Second, they have looked to dreams as part of our survival kit, giving us clues to possible future events we may want to avoid or enact. Third, they have known that dreaming is medicine, in several important senses. Dreams show us what is going on inside the body, often before physical symptoms present. Continue reading

Kundalini Yoga

Related imageLAYA YOGA SAMPRADAYA Esoteric Teachings
By Swami Lalitamohan G.K., Laya Avatara

Sage Gorakshnatha of Nepal, a disciple of Matsyendranath, is the modern founder of Laya yoga tantrika. Laya means to “re-absorb” “fusion” “dissolution” and as a Yoga system means to re-absorb all of the energies and forces normally dissipated in daily living.

Laya Yoga is an ancient form of meditation, with concentration on energy centers or chakras. There are five main energy centers in the spine and two in the head. Laya yoga attempts to locate these energy centers and channelize them through meditation. Laya essentially means to dissolve all karmic patterns or conditioning and merge into the transcendental reality. It also means deep concentration and making an effort to overcome the ego, thereby rising to a higher state of consciousness, called Turiya.

The student must have profound knowledge of Raja Yoga, Sankhya and Tantra philosophy. It involves the arousal of Kundalini Shakti, its control and conversion into higher forces and powers. Tejas and Ojas (higher forces) are produces through these practices and the highest of all emotional-mental ecstasies are created by these techniques. Like all the higher aspects of Yoga, these practices must be undertaken with a competent Guru who has the personal experience of the arousal and the control of such shakti. Continue reading

Vajrayana Buddhism

Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand.Vajrayana

Vajrayana Buddhism (Devanagari: बज्रयान) is also known as Tantric Buddhism, Tantrayāna, Mantrayana, Mantranaya, Secret Mantra, Esoteric Buddhism and the Diamond Vehicle. These terms are not regarded as equivalent.

Vajrayana is as an extension of Mahayana Buddhism since it differs in its practices, rather than its philosophy. The Mahayana has two practice paths: the Sutrayana method of perfecting good qualities and the Vajrayāna method of taking the intended outcome of Buddhahood as the path. The Vajrayana requires mystical experience in order to experience Buddha-nature prior to full enlightenment. In order to transmit these experiences, a body of esoteric knowledge has been accumulated by Buddhist tantric yogis and is passed via lineages of transmission. In order to access this knowledge, the practitioner requires initiation from a skilled spiritual teacher or guru.

The Vajrayana is often viewed as the third major Yana (or “vehicle”) of Buddhism, alongside the Theravada and Mahayana. According to this view, there were three “turnings of the wheel of dharma”. Continue reading

Tan-Tara For Women

Related imageTantra for Women
by Ishtara (1999)  [Edited]

Many women carry traumatic imprints of an age of injury, humiliation and degradation, in their wombs and bodies. These memories are reaffirmed not only as women experience objectification of their bodies, forceful sex, painful childbirth, but also through unfulfilled, incomplete orgasms. Most women choose to compromise their vast potential by remaining in a state of denial about their own sexual needs, wants and desires. Conditioned by society to feel insecure about their bodies and to compete with their sisters for available men, women feel disenfranchised and seldom realize their full sexual prowess.

How do we, as women, reclaim our sexual power?

The first step is to stop denying and to inform ourselves as to what has happened to women – how we have lost our power to patriarchal religions that deny both our sexuality and our spirituality. Since our sexuality and spirituality are inextricably connected, denying either of them denies our wholeness. Such denial leaves us fragmented beings searching for an identity which doesn’t lie in the inaccurate models of a male dominated, sexually repressive culture. The only models of women that the patriarchal religions have provided for both men and women are those of the virgin-mother or the whore. Continue reading

Tantra Yoga

Image result for tantra tarotWhat is Tantra Yoga? Definitely Orgasmic, But Not Sexual
Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev (2013)

Question: What is tantra exactly? It is said that in the tantric tradition, when the relationship between the guru and shishya becomes intimate and sacred, there could be a closeness that could even be sexual. The shishya-guru attraction – as evident in the Krishna-gopi tradition of amorousness – might manifest as sexual union. So what is tantra really and how does it relate to our sexuality?

Sadhguru: Unfortunately, in western countries, tantra is being presented in such a way that it is supposed to mean uninhibited sex. It has been so badly misinterpreted. This is because books on tantra have been written by people who just want to sell books. They are not tantrics in any way.

The word “tantra” literally means a technique or a technology. This is an inner technology. These are subjective methods not objective methods. But in the current understanding in society, the word “tantra” refers to very unorthodox or socially unacceptable methods. It is just that certain aspects are used in a certain way. It is not any different from yoga. It is a limb of yoga called tantra yoga. Continue reading

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