Tag Archives: Elements

Dragons and Elements

“There is a devil there is no doubt, but is he trying to get into us or trying to get out?”
~ Tsem Rinpoche

The Dragon and the Five Elements
By Tsem Rinpoche, 2010

The Dragon: A Wood Sign
The Dragon sign is of the Wood element. Generally, Wood bestows an expansive, open characteristic to people born with this element. They find it easy to get along well with others, especially in a group context and bring good, energising vibes to any situation. They are compassionate people, who look for ways to help others and bring justice.

Many Chinese believe that life will be more exciting when a Dragon is born into their family. If there are three Dragons within the family, they believe that they are blessed with incredible luck and prosperity. Continue reading

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Gorin of Sho

Gorin-No-Sho
Musashi Miyamoto’s Book of Five Rings

While in reclusion, Miyamoto Musashi wrote the “Go Rin No Sho”, known in English as “The Book Of Five Rings”, which was a text on kenjutsu, martial arts and philosophy.

Many translations of the “Go Rin No Sho” have been made over the years, and it enjoys an audience considerably broader than just those interested in martial arts. For instance, some business leaders find its discussion of conflict and how to take advantage of it to be relevant to their work.

The five “books” refer to the idea that there are different elements of battle, just as there are different physical elements in life, as is believed in Buddhism, Shintoism, and other Eastern religions.

The term “Ichi School”, which is referenced in the Go Rin No Sho, refers to the “Niten No Ichi Ryu”, or “Ni Ten Ichi Ryu”, which when literally translated means “Two Swords, One Heaven”, although the translation could be interpreted as “Two Swords, One Spirit”, or “Two Swords, One Entity”. Continue reading

Five Rings to Godai

Five elements (Japanese philosophy)

The five elements philosophy in Japanese Buddhism, godai (五大?, lit. “five great”), is derived from Indian Vastu shastra philosophy and Buddhist beliefs. It is perhaps best known in the Western world for its use in Miyamoto Musashi’s famous text Gorin-no-sho (The Book of Five Rings), in which he explains different aspects of swordsmanship by assigning each aspect to an element.

The five elements are, in ascending order of power, Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, and Void.

Earth

地 Chi (or ji) or tsuchi, meaning “Earth”, represents the hard, solid objects of the earth. The most basic example of chi is in a stone. Stones are highly resistant to movement or change, as is anything heavily influenced by chi. In people, the bones, muscles and tissues are represented by chi. Emotionally, chi is predominantly associated with stubbornness, collectivity, stability, physicality, and gravity. It is a desire Continue reading

KMT – Book of Doors – 65 of 78 Tarot Deck

book-of-doors-2Review by Bonnie Cehovet

“The Book Of Doors” is based on the concepts of the universal language of the symbols of Egypt, and on the archetypal nature of Egyptian deities. Two keys comprise the system behind this deck: the alchemical text known as the Emerald Tablet of Hermes Trismegistus (which describes the transmutation of primal elements to pure gold), and the numerical system of Pythagorus (specifically the magic square that provides the basis of the numbering for the Neteru). Continue reading

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