Tag Archives: Consciousness

Thot of Knowledge

ausetAuset’s Star ~ Humanity’s Mystery

SOPDET/SEPDET (Kemetic/ancient Egyptian) or SOTHIS/SIRIUS (Greek), brightest of all fixed stars, was regarded as the most important star in the sky in Kemet (ancient Egypt) forming the astronomical foundation of their religious system, delineating the rhythms and cycles by which they lived, and establishing its mysterious connection with humanity. Thus Sopdet (meaning “she who is sharp”) is said to be the cradle of human knowledge. Over twenty times brighter than our sun and twice as massive, its brilliant white color is tinged with blue and purple. All the colors of the rainbow sparkle from Sopdet (Sirius) when observed low on the horizon during certain atmospheric conditions.

Some mysteries regard Sopdet as the true light and original source of all life including our sun – “shadow” of the great star – which illuminates the illusory physical world; whereas the great star, Sopdet, keeps the true spiritual world alive. Sopdet has crossed from the east bank of the Milky Way where it resided some 100,000 years ago to the west bank of the celestial Nile River where it currently rests. Continue reading

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Sign of Ampu Ta

ANPU (Anubis)

God Anpu (Anubis, Ampu, Inpu, Ienpw, Imeut), the protector of Auset (Isis), was originally the God of the Dead before Ausar (Osiris) took over his position. Anubis is often referred to as the son of Nebthet (Nephthys) and Ausar.

NTR Anpu was represented as a man with a head of a jackal. He is depicted this way to represent his position as the God of the Dead. He is seldom shown as fully-human, but he is depicted in the Temple of Abydos of Rameses II as so. On the other hand, there is a statue of Anubis as a full jackal in the tomb of Tutankhamun.

Anpu is the guardian of the underworld and oversees mummification. It is His duty to find lost souls wandering cemeteries and to help guide them through the realm of the dead until they can persuade Sekhmet to let them into the valley of immortality.

It is Anpu’s task to test a soul’s faith and its knowledge of the KMT NTRW. Anpu placed the soul’s heart on the Scales of Justice during the Weighing of the Heart – where hearts were weighed against the Continue reading

Sign of Tehuti

Neter Tehuti (NTR THT)

Appearance: Tehuti is portrayed as a man with the head of an Ibis wearing a crown of the full and crescent moon of the Sun; usually writing.

Western gods: Thot, Hermes

Symbols: Ibis, pen & tablet or papyrus (writing implements), Full and crescent moon, Baboon.

Principle: Resonance – (word/sound/power)
Function: Communication

Western Astrology Dates: 22 August to 23 September

Energies

Tehuti’s powers are concerned with the recording of ‘facts’ or ‘data’ for a cosmic memory that when necessary may reveal its ancient wisdom to whoever calls for it. His energy is said to break through mental barriers; it allows information to become known and secrets or ‘lost’ or ‘forgotten’ ideas to be revealed.

Tehuti assists in the discovery of ‘lost knowledge’ but he communicates more directly with the mind in such a way as is said to ease mental confusion. Continue reading

A Tulp A

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Golden Shrimp Plant? It reminded me of a tulpa.

And tulips as his lesser cousin.

Photo credit: Nature and all it’s Glory https://web.facebook. com/natureandallitsglory/

Found at: https://purplerays.wordpress .com/2017/08/03/good-morning-with-golden-shrimp-plants-2/

Breathing Nimitta

The Third Eye - Page 5 - Dharma WheelTHE MYSTERY OF THE BREATH NIMITTA
OR THE CASE OF THE MISSING SIMILE

By Bhikkhu Sona.

INTRODUCTION

As the title suggests, there is a significant puzzle to be solved by any meditator or scholar who tries to clearly understand the qualities of experience, which accompany the transition from mere attention to respiration to full immersion in jhanic consciousness. I will attempt to show that there are good grounds for confusion on this matter as one traces the historical progression of the commentarial accounts from the Patisambhidamagga through the Vimuttimagga to the (later) Visuddhimagga.

Since the Visuddhimagga is so influential and so widely quoted by modern teachers, it would seem critical that it is reliable and, if in certain aspects it is not, then, with supporting evidence, to show clearly why it is not.

The body of this essay will show that a description of the mind of the jhanic meditator found in the Canon itself and quoted in the Patisambhidamagga as a simile involving a comparison of mind with a full clear moon, degenerates to a mistaken literalization of these images as internally produced visual data. Since the contents of mind are not easy to point to, the Buddha frequently used similes comparing visual and other sense objects with mental contents in order for meditators to clearly understand what they should be seeking and experiencing.

In religious traditions of all kinds we often find a naive tendency to take literally what is meant as a simile. It seems this process has occurred somewhere along the line and has become enshrined in the Continue reading

Animate Nimitta

... Black Fashion Magazine Black Models Black Contemporary Artists ArtNimitta

By Nynatiloka, Buddhist Dictionary

Nimitta: mark, sign; image; target, object; cause, condition. These meanings are used in, and adapted to, many contexts of which only the doctrinal ones are mentioned here.

  1. ‘Mental (reflex-) image’, obtained in meditation. In full clarity, it will appear in the mind by successful practice of certain concentration-exercises and will then appear as vividly as if seen by the eye. The object perceived at the very beginning of concentration is called the preparatory image (parikamma-nimitta). The still unsteady and unclear image, which arises when the mind has reached a weak degree of concentration, is called the acquired image (uggaha-nimitta). An entirely clear and immovable image arising at a higher degree of concentration is the counter-image (paṭ””’ibhāga-nimitta”). As soon as this image arises, the stage of neighbourhood (or access) concentration (upacāra-samādhi) is reached.
  2. ‘Sign of (previous) kamma’ (kamma-nimitta) and ‘sign of (the future) destiny’ (gati-nimitta); these arise as mental objects of the last karmic consciousness before death (maraṇ””’āsanna””’ kamma.

Usages (1) and (2) are commentarial (s. App.). In Sutta usage, the term occurs, e.g. as: Continue reading

Touch of Nimitta

100 day meditation challenge 010Day 10 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge
Bodhipaksa, 2013

Yesterday I wrote about samapattis, which are slightly strange, and often a bit disturbing, experiences that can arise in meditation. They’re often a bit hallucinatory, and it’s not a good idea to pay much attention to them.

Nimittas are another kind of unusual experience we can have in meditation, but they’re more useful. The word “nimitta” literally means a “sign” or a “hint.” These are experiences we can have that let us know we’re making progress in meditation.

Nimittas, like samapattis, come in different forms. They can be visual, or kinesthetic, or even auditory.

In one classic meditation text, the Vimuttimagga, the arising of nimittas is described like this:

“the nimitta arises with a pleasant feeling similar to that which is produced in the action of spinning cotton or silk cotton. Also it is likened to the pleasant feeling produced by a breeze.”

These are kinesthetic nimittas. They can be auditory, like a subtle sound accompanying the breathing that’s not heard through the ears. Visual nimittas might take the form of a stable image, or just a stable perception of light. Continue reading

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