Tag Archives: Body

Sacrifice of Lobster

The Orgasmic Mind: The Neurological Roots of Sexual Pleasure
Achieving sexual climax requires a complex conspiracy of sensory and psychological signals—and the eventual silencing of critical brain areas

By Martin Portner, Scientific American Mind, 2008 [Excerpt]

[S]exual desire and orgasm are subject to various influences on the brain and nervous system, which controls the sex glands and genitals. And many of those influences are environmental. Recent research, for example, shows that visual stimuli spur sexual stirrings in women, as they do in men.

Achieving orgasm, brain-imaging studies show, involves more than heightened arousal. It requires a release of inhibitions and control in which the brain’s center of vigilance shuts down in males; in females, various areas of the brain involved in controlling thoughts and emotions become silent. The brain’s pleasure centers tend to light up brightly in the brain scans of both sexes, especially in those of Continue reading

Grasping in the Dark O

From Six things science has revealed about the female orgasm, New Scientist, 2009

This week we report on the continuing debate about female ejaculation: is it real, and if so why does it happen?

Ejaculation is just one of the aspects of female sexuality that are being demystified by research. In particular, the female orgasm, the subject of so many myths and folk beliefs, is gradually being understood.

Following some intense field research, here are some of the key facts about the female orgasm, as revealed by modern science.

The G spot is real

The G spot is a small region in the vagina that, if stimulated, can produce wildly intense orgasms – or so the popular claim goes. However, in 2008, an Italian research team found anatomical differences between women who could have G-spot orgasms and women who couldn’t. (See: Ultrasound nails location of the elusive G spot)

The brain switches off Continue reading

Dhatu

quilled-paper-anatomy-lisa-nilsson-2DHATU
From Herbs and Ayurveda

Dhatu is a Sanskrit (which binds together) word for tissues. The human body consists of seven basic tissues known as “Sapta Dhatu”. According to Ashtanga Ayurved, the seven Dhatu constitute the anatomy and physiology of the human body. They play a major role in the chain of bodily activities, ultimately ensuring a healthy body and a healthy mind.

There are seven Dhatu in all which forms the different organs and different body systems. These are Rasa, Rakta, Mansa, Meda, Asthi, Majja and Shukra. [Each] Continue reading

Tree Emotions

Breathe - Marcelo JimeneEMOTIONS AND ORGANS
By David K. Osborn

The Emotional Life of the Body

In modern medicine, we tend to take a very mechanical view of the body and the physiological functions of its component organs. But in Greek Medicine and [the medical systems it was based on], the internal organs were seen as being strongly affected by the emotions.

Heart: The heart, being the principal organ of the Vital Faculty, is very sensitive to emotional states. Noble, expansive, uplifting emotions like courage, valor, honesty, forthrightness, altruism and Continue reading

Lung – Breath

Tsa rLungLUNG

Lung (Tibetan: rlung) is a word that means ‘wind’ or ‘breath’. It is a key concept in the Vajrayana traditions of Tibetan Buddhism and as such is part of the symbolic ‘twilight language’, used to non-conceptually point to a variety of meanings.

Lung is a concept that is particularly important to understandings of the subtle body and the Three Vajras (body, speech and mind). Tibetan medicine practitioner Dr. Tamdin Sither Bradley provides a summary:

The general description of rLung is that it is a subtle flow of energy and out of the five elements (air, fire, water, earth and space) it is most closely connected with air. However it is not simply the air which we breathe or the wind in our stomachs, it goes much deeper than that. Continue reading

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