Touch of Nimitta

100 day meditation challenge 010Day 10 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge
Bodhipaksa, 2013

Yesterday I wrote about samapattis, which are slightly strange, and often a bit disturbing, experiences that can arise in meditation. They’re often a bit hallucinatory, and it’s not a good idea to pay much attention to them.

Nimittas are another kind of unusual experience we can have in meditation, but they’re more useful. The word “nimitta” literally means a “sign” or a “hint.” These are experiences we can have that let us know we’re making progress in meditation.

Nimittas, like samapattis, come in different forms. They can be visual, or kinesthetic, or even auditory.

In one classic meditation text, the Vimuttimagga, the arising of nimittas is described like this:

“the nimitta arises with a pleasant feeling similar to that which is produced in the action of spinning cotton or silk cotton. Also it is likened to the pleasant feeling produced by a breeze.”

These are kinesthetic nimittas. They can be auditory, like a subtle sound accompanying the breathing that’s not heard through the ears. Visual nimittas might take the form of a stable image, or just a stable perception of light. Continue reading

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Samapathy

100 day meditation challenge 009Day 9 of Wildmind’s 100 Day Meditation Challenge
Bodhipaksa, 2013

During my sit I saw a bright white/yellow circle shape flash of light in between my eyebrows (closed eye meditation). The light came rushing at me and filled my vision then vanished. While very interesting, it actually freaked me out a bit. Is there a name for this experience?

I replied, “It’s what we call a samapatti. There are various kinds of these, and some of them involve light, although they can be tactile, proprioceptive, auditory, etc. They usually arise as the mind is starting to settle, and they’re more common in people who are relatively new to meditation. They’re nothing to worry about (they’re common) nor are they something to get very excited about (they’re just “noise” in the system).”

I see samapattis as arising in a few ways: They’re very similar to experiences that people have when they’re exposed to sensory deprivation, which makes me think there’s an element of that going on; the mind is getting quieter, but we’ve not fully tapped into the richness of our experience — especially of the body — and so the mind starts trying to make sense of random neuronal “noise.” One of the most common samapattis is the perception of “swirling lights.” Continue reading

KMT Dreams

(Ancient) Egyptian  Dream Beliefs
From Beliefnet [2015] [Edited]

Dream interpretation links back to the ancient Egyptians with the first written record of dream interpretation around 1350 B.C. – although modern findings see it as much earlier.  This record is called the Chester Beatty Papyrus. It is the oldest dream book in existence. The book portrayed images of what the dreams meant. In KMT HetHeru was responsible for dreams. [The article stated Bes, but it is HetHeru. 7M]

Dreams were a very important, and indeed, sacred part of KMT culture. Dreams were of utmost importance and dream interpreters were called “Masters of the Secret Things”. These temple priests were educated and most of their knowledge was taken from The Book of the Dead – a book of KMT wisdom. In this system of belief the gods revealed themselves in dreams. They also saw that dreams gave warnings, advice, and prophecies.

In dreams our eyes are opened. The word for dream, rswt, is etymologically connected to the root meaning “to be awake”. It was written with a symbol representing an open eye. Continue reading

Veil of Dreams

- otomi-charms 2Photo: Otomi protective figure made with amate paper (bark cloth) in Sam Noble Museum, University of Oklahoma

Why Dreaming Is Important
By Robert Moss, 2015

A dream is a wake-up call. It takes us beyond what we already know. Dreams are the language of the soul, and they are experiences of the soul.

There are “big” dreams and “little” dreams, of course. In big dreams, we go traveling and we may receive visitations. We travel across time – into the future and the past – and we travel to other dimensions of reality. This is reflected in the words for “dream” that are used by indigenous people who have retained strong dreaming traditions and respect for dreamers. Among the Makiritare, a shamanic dreaming people of Venezuela, for example, the word for dream is adekato, which means “a journey of the soul”.

Most societies have valued dreams and dreamers for three main reasons. First, they have looked to dreams for contact with a wiser source than the everyday mind – call that God, or Nature, or the Self. Second, they have looked to dreams as part of our survival kit, giving us clues to possible future events we may want to avoid or enact. Third, they have known that dreaming is medicine, in several important senses. Dreams show us what is going on inside the body, often before physical symptoms present. Continue reading

NTRW and Book of Doors

Image result for Tepi-Aui-Un

NTRW from the Book of Doors: Tepi-Aui-Un
By Temple of MAAT-TEHUTI

The NTR of NTRW: NTR NTRW is an expression of the absolute. The symbol for NTR was believed by Wallis Budge to be an axe. We now believe it to be a flag or pennant. It’s the standard that’s placed in front of or on top of the temple to signify the NTR. Two modern day spiritual systems use flags in ways that are similar to their use in KMT. In Tibet the prayer flag has a mantra written on it. When the wind blows the vibration of the spiritual energy is activated which extends the divinity’s blessing to the surrounding area. In Voudon tradition flags are designed according to the direction of the spirits. The flags develop and collect psychic power in them.
In KMT the pole of the flag is symbolically related to the tree. The Tree of Life is the Tree of Nut that restores life and energy to both NTR and people. The tree is also in contact with both heaven and earth. Every part of a tree works to sustain life. Its roots absorb nutrients from the earth, its leaves absorb nutrients from the air, and all energy is transformed into the sap that nourishes itself and other forms of life. The cloth of the flag is made of a natural material that represents the crossing of cosmic coordinates. The flag is activated by Shu-Tefnut the NTRW of air.

(Note: modern day scientific data informs us that magnetism and gravity not air are the two forces that separate Earth-Geb from Nut-Cosmos. Shu and Tefnut should also be considered the twin NTRW of magnetism and gravity.) Continue reading

KMT Sensitivity

Esoterism and MDW NTR Pt. 2
A re-interpretation of Chaps. 3 & 4 of Esoterism and Symbol by R. A. Schwaller deLubicz
By Temple of MAAT-TEHUTI

The cerebral organ operates in stages. The first stage consists of your five senses. The senses acknowledge and record observations. The second stage consists of your memory. The memory compares the recorded ideas. The third stage is reason, which operates on a different level and will be dealt with later for the sake of clarity.

The senses are the organs we use to become aware of the principle elements.
Touch belongs to the Earth element.
– Taste belongs to the water element.
– Smell belongs to the air element.
Sight belongs to the fire element.
Our senses are not aware of an activity until they can oppose it with resistance of a similar nature.

Our ability to touch or physically feel things lets us become aware of everything that forms a material obstacle to the body. Touch is the Earth element. Our ability to taste is only possible when something is Continue reading

Metu Neter – Five Principles

KemetFive Principles

Peace: “The ultimate Why behind all actions.  The emotional /pleasure factor in life.” (Amen, Metu Neter, Volume 1, p. 96)

  • Peace is governed by Amen ( 0) which sits above the Paut Neteru (Tree of Life) and corresponds to our learned ability to control our feelings; see the discussion of an Ausar for a description of the kind of person who can obtain Peace at this level.  This kind of Peace is everlasting and does not depend on having or not having any thing.
  • Peace is also governed by Geb which is the last branch of the Paut Neteru (Tree of Life).  This kind of Peace is obtained through the gratification of the senses–an exhilarating workout, a great meal, satisfying sexual relations, etc.  This kind of Peace is transient.
  • True Peace is obtained by finding the fulcrum points to balance both the Peace available through Amen and the Peace available through Geb.  Peace is therefore a dynamic process.

Self/Identity: “What man thinks He is” (Amen, Metu Neter, Volume 1, p. 96). We have an identity we share with others and we have a unique identity. Continue reading

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