Category Archives: Rituals

KMT Dreams

(Ancient) Egyptian  Dream Beliefs
From Beliefnet [2015] [Edited]

Dream interpretation links back to the ancient Egyptians with the first written record of dream interpretation around 1350 B.C. – although modern findings see it as much earlier.  This record is called the Chester Beatty Papyrus. It is the oldest dream book in existence. The book portrayed images of what the dreams meant. In KMT HetHeru was responsible for dreams. [The article stated Bes, but it is HetHeru. 7M]

Dreams were a very important, and indeed, sacred part of KMT culture. Dreams were of utmost importance and dream interpreters were called “Masters of the Secret Things”. These temple priests were educated and most of their knowledge was taken from The Book of the Dead – a book of KMT wisdom. In this system of belief the gods revealed themselves in dreams. They also saw that dreams gave warnings, advice, and prophecies.

In dreams our eyes are opened. The word for dream, rswt, is etymologically connected to the root meaning “to be awake”. It was written with a symbol representing an open eye. Continue reading

Veil of Dreams

- otomi-charms 2Photo: Otomi protective figure made with amate paper (bark cloth) in Sam Noble Museum, University of Oklahoma

Why Dreaming Is Important
By Robert Moss, 2015

A dream is a wake-up call. It takes us beyond what we already know. Dreams are the language of the soul, and they are experiences of the soul.

There are “big” dreams and “little” dreams, of course. In big dreams, we go traveling and we may receive visitations. We travel across time – into the future and the past – and we travel to other dimensions of reality. This is reflected in the words for “dream” that are used by indigenous people who have retained strong dreaming traditions and respect for dreamers. Among the Makiritare, a shamanic dreaming people of Venezuela, for example, the word for dream is adekato, which means “a journey of the soul”.

Most societies have valued dreams and dreamers for three main reasons. First, they have looked to dreams for contact with a wiser source than the everyday mind – call that God, or Nature, or the Self. Second, they have looked to dreams as part of our survival kit, giving us clues to possible future events we may want to avoid or enact. Third, they have known that dreaming is medicine, in several important senses. Dreams show us what is going on inside the body, often before physical symptoms present. Continue reading

NTRW and Book of Doors

Image result for Tepi-Aui-Un

NTRW from the Book of Doors: Tepi-Aui-Un
By Temple of MAAT-TEHUTI

The NTR of NTRW: NTR NTRW is an expression of the absolute. The symbol for NTR was believed by Wallis Budge to be an axe. We now believe it to be a flag or pennant. It’s the standard that’s placed in front of or on top of the temple to signify the NTR. Two modern day spiritual systems use flags in ways that are similar to their use in KMT. In Tibet the prayer flag has a mantra written on it. When the wind blows the vibration of the spiritual energy is activated which extends the divinity’s blessing to the surrounding area. In Voudon tradition flags are designed according to the direction of the spirits. The flags develop and collect psychic power in them.
In KMT the pole of the flag is symbolically related to the tree. The Tree of Life is the Tree of Nut that restores life and energy to both NTR and people. The tree is also in contact with both heaven and earth. Every part of a tree works to sustain life. Its roots absorb nutrients from the earth, its leaves absorb nutrients from the air, and all energy is transformed into the sap that nourishes itself and other forms of life. The cloth of the flag is made of a natural material that represents the crossing of cosmic coordinates. The flag is activated by Shu-Tefnut the NTRW of air.

(Note: modern day scientific data informs us that magnetism and gravity not air are the two forces that separate Earth-Geb from Nut-Cosmos. Shu and Tefnut should also be considered the twin NTRW of magnetism and gravity.) Continue reading

Vajrayana Buddhism

Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand.Vajrayana

Vajrayana Buddhism (Devanagari: बज्रयान) is also known as Tantric Buddhism, Tantrayāna, Mantrayana, Mantranaya, Secret Mantra, Esoteric Buddhism and the Diamond Vehicle. These terms are not regarded as equivalent.

Vajrayana is as an extension of Mahayana Buddhism since it differs in its practices, rather than its philosophy. The Mahayana has two practice paths: the Sutrayana method of perfecting good qualities and the Vajrayāna method of taking the intended outcome of Buddhahood as the path. The Vajrayana requires mystical experience in order to experience Buddha-nature prior to full enlightenment. In order to transmit these experiences, a body of esoteric knowledge has been accumulated by Buddhist tantric yogis and is passed via lineages of transmission. In order to access this knowledge, the practitioner requires initiation from a skilled spiritual teacher or guru.

The Vajrayana is often viewed as the third major Yana (or “vehicle”) of Buddhism, alongside the Theravada and Mahayana. According to this view, there were three “turnings of the wheel of dharma”. Continue reading

Western Tantra

Image result for tantraSPIRITUAL SEX
by Walter Last [Edited]

Sexuality is closely related to spirituality in several ways. In its negative aspects of lust, sexual excess, degradation and rape, it appears as the antithesis of spirituality, and in this light it has been seen in the Christian tradition. However, in its positive aspects our sexuality can open our heart to love, and enable us to have experiences similar to meditative states and mystical bliss during or instead of an orgasm and its afterglow. In a less obvious way, sexual energies can be channeled upward to develop our energy centers or chakra system and higher energy bodies. According to esoteric and yoga teachings, this is all part of our spiritual evolution.

The idea of celibacy for priests, nuns and monks is to spiritualize sexual energies as in meditation, rituals and other devotional practices. While this generally involves conscious exercises as in yoga, Christian mystics commonly transformed their energies without conscious awareness through intense Continue reading

For Infinite Eyes

…shades of night.

“The sky grew darker, painted blue on blue,
one stroke at a time, into deeper
and deeper shades of night.”

~ Haruki Murakami

Image~Tender is cheetah night by Carlos Santero
Text & image source: Moonlight Serenade https://web.facebook.com/Moonlight-Serenade-228504310532112/
Source: https://purplerays.wordpress.com/2016/08/10/shades-of-night/

Double Loops

 

Nice pick-me-up. Found at: https://bostaj.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/can-jazz-be-understood-pt-1/

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