Category Archives: Mind

KMT Dreams

(Ancient) Egyptian  Dream Beliefs
From Beliefnet [2015] [Edited]

Dream interpretation links back to the ancient Egyptians with the first written record of dream interpretation around 1350 B.C. – although modern findings see it as much earlier.  This record is called the Chester Beatty Papyrus. It is the oldest dream book in existence. The book portrayed images of what the dreams meant. In KMT HetHeru was responsible for dreams. [The article stated Bes, but it is HetHeru. 7M]

Dreams were a very important, and indeed, sacred part of KMT culture. Dreams were of utmost importance and dream interpreters were called “Masters of the Secret Things”. These temple priests were educated and most of their knowledge was taken from The Book of the Dead – a book of KMT wisdom. In this system of belief the gods revealed themselves in dreams. They also saw that dreams gave warnings, advice, and prophecies.

In dreams our eyes are opened. The word for dream, rswt, is etymologically connected to the root meaning “to be awake”. It was written with a symbol representing an open eye. Continue reading

Vajrayana Buddhism

Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand.Vajrayana

Vajrayana Buddhism (Devanagari: बज्रयान) is also known as Tantric Buddhism, Tantrayāna, Mantrayana, Mantranaya, Secret Mantra, Esoteric Buddhism and the Diamond Vehicle. These terms are not regarded as equivalent.

Vajrayana is as an extension of Mahayana Buddhism since it differs in its practices, rather than its philosophy. The Mahayana has two practice paths: the Sutrayana method of perfecting good qualities and the Vajrayāna method of taking the intended outcome of Buddhahood as the path. The Vajrayana requires mystical experience in order to experience Buddha-nature prior to full enlightenment. In order to transmit these experiences, a body of esoteric knowledge has been accumulated by Buddhist tantric yogis and is passed via lineages of transmission. In order to access this knowledge, the practitioner requires initiation from a skilled spiritual teacher or guru.

The Vajrayana is often viewed as the third major Yana (or “vehicle”) of Buddhism, alongside the Theravada and Mahayana. According to this view, there were three “turnings of the wheel of dharma”. Continue reading

Tan-Tara For Women

Related imageTantra for Women
by Ishtara (1999)  [Edited]

Many women carry traumatic imprints of an age of injury, humiliation and degradation, in their wombs and bodies. These memories are reaffirmed not only as women experience objectification of their bodies, forceful sex, painful childbirth, but also through unfulfilled, incomplete orgasms. Most women choose to compromise their vast potential by remaining in a state of denial about their own sexual needs, wants and desires. Conditioned by society to feel insecure about their bodies and to compete with their sisters for available men, women feel disenfranchised and seldom realize their full sexual prowess.

How do we, as women, reclaim our sexual power?

The first step is to stop denying and to inform ourselves as to what has happened to women – how we have lost our power to patriarchal religions that deny both our sexuality and our spirituality. Since our sexuality and spirituality are inextricably connected, denying either of them denies our wholeness. Such denial leaves us fragmented beings searching for an identity which doesn’t lie in the inaccurate models of a male dominated, sexually repressive culture. The only models of women that the patriarchal religions have provided for both men and women are those of the virgin-mother or the whore. Continue reading

Tantra

TANTRA

Tantra (Sanskrit: तन्त्र) is the esoteric tradition of Hinduism and Buddhism that co-developed most likely about the middle of 1st millennium CE. The term tantra, in the Indian traditions, also means any systematic broadly applicable “text, theory, system, method, instrument, technique or practice”.

In Hinduism, the tantra tradition is associated with its goddess tradition called Shaktism, followed by Shaivism and Vaishnavism. In Buddhism, the Vajrayana tradition is known for its extensive tantra ideas and practices. Tantric Hindu and Buddhist traditions have influenced other religious traditions such as Jainism, Sikhism, the Tibetan Bön tradition, Daoism, and the Japanese Shintō tradition.

The Hindu texts that describe these topics are called Tantras, Āgamas or Samhitās.

Etymology

Tantra (Sanskrit: तन्त्र) literally means “loom, warp, weave”. The connotation of the word tantra to mean an esoteric practice or religious ritualism is a colonial era European invention. The term is based on the Continue reading

Double Loops

 

Nice pick-me-up. Found at: https://bostaj.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/can-jazz-be-understood-pt-1/

Thumbled Down

Humiliation

Humiliation is [an attack on a person through] the abasement of pride, which creates mortification, or leads to a state of being humbled or reduced to lowliness or submission. It is an emotion felt by a person who feels his social status has been (deliberately) decreased. Humiliation can be brought about through intimidation, physical, verbal or psychological abuse, mistreatment or trickery, or by embarrassment if a person is revealed to have committed a socially or legally unacceptable act. Whereas humility can be sought alone as a means to de-emphasise the ego, humiliation must involve other person(s), though not necessarily directly or willingly.

Humiliating is often used as a way of asserting power over other people, and is a common form of oppression or abuse used in a police, military, or prison context, (most reported to happen) during legal interrogations or illegal torture sessions. Many now-obsolete public punishments were deliberately Continue reading

Moon Key In Pisces

New Moon in Pisces, March 9th, 2016 – Wu Wei
By Aeternalight, 14 February 2016

Wu Wei is one of the most important (if not the most important) tenets in Taoism; this Chinese expression can be loosely translated as “non action” or “non doing” – a mode of consciousness that seems perfectly suited to the yielding, transcendent nature of Pisces.

Taoist philosophy recognizes that the Universe works harmoniously according to a natural order governed by unalterable laws; Wu Wei, which is not to be mistaken for inertia or passivity, is the art of effortlessly, graciously swimming with this current – ultimately becoming vessels of the Tao itself, thus responding to life in the most spontaneous way possible. Continue reading

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