Category Archives: NTRW

Thot of Knowledge

ausetAuset’s Star ~ Humanity’s Mystery

SOPDET/SEPDET or SOTHIS/SIRIUS, brightest of all fixed stars, was regarded as the most important star in the sky in Kemet forming the astronomical foundation of their religious system, delineating the rhythms and cycles by which they lived, and establishing its mysterious connection with humanity.

Sopdet (meaning “she who is sharp”) is said to be the cradle of human knowledge. Over twenty times brighter than our sun and twice as massive, its brilliant white color is tinged with blue and purple. All the colors of the rainbow sparkle from Sopdet (Sirius) when observed low on the horizon during certain atmospheric conditions.

Sopdet isthe true light and original source of all life including our sun – “shadow” of the great star – which illuminates the illusory physical world; whereas the great star Sopdet, keeps the true spiritual world alive. Sopdet has crossed from the east bank of the Milky Way where it resided some 100,000 years ago to the west bank of the celestial River where it currently rests. Continue reading

NTRW and Book of d’Or

Image result for Tepi-Aui-Un

NTRW from the Book of Doors: Tepi-Aui-Un
By Temple of MAAT-TEHUTI

The NTR of NTRW: NTR NTRW is an expression of the absolute. The symbol for NTR was believed by Wallis Budge to be an axe. We now believe it to be a flag or pennant. It’s the standard that’s placed in front of or on top of the temple to signify the NTR. Two modern day spiritual systems use flags in ways that are similar to their use in KMT. In Tibet the prayer flag has a mantra written on it. When the wind blows the vibration of the spiritual energy is activated which extends the divinity’s blessing to the surrounding area. In Voudon tradition flags are designed according to the direction of the spirits. The flags develop and collect psychic power in them.

In KMT the pole of the flag is symbolically related to the tree. The Tree of Life is the Tree of Nut that restores life and energy to both NTR and people. The tree is also in contact with both heaven and earth. Every part of a tree works to sustain life. Its roots absorb nutrients from the earth, its leaves absorb nutrients from the air, and all energy is transformed into the sap that nourishes itself and other forms of life. The cloth of the flag is made of a natural material that represents the crossing of cosmic coordinates. The flag is activated by Shu-Tefnut the NTRW of air.

(Note: modern day scientific data informs us that magnetism and gravity not air are the two forces that separate Earth-Geb from Nut-Cosmos. Shu and Tefnut should also be considered the twin NTRW of magnetism and gravity.) Continue reading

Metu Neter – Ma’at – 11 Laws of God

Kemetic Tree of LifeThe 11 Laws of God:

0. Law of Amen – You were made in the likeness of a peace that nothing can disturb. Reclaim your peace that you may attain to your reason for coming into existence – the enjoyment of life.

1. Law of Ausar – Your nature is an unconquerable peace, therefore nothing or no one in the world can be against you. All experiences come to you to promote your reclamation of peace, that you may in turn, aquire wisdom and power.

2. Law of Tehuti – When all of your thoughts, feelings and actions reflect the Word of God, then the power of God’s spirit and a peace that nothing can challange will flow through your being. Continue reading

Metu Neter – Amen

Amun AmenMETU NETER Vol. 1, Pg. 212

Amen means “concealed”. It is the Kamitic counterpart of the term “Subjective”. It corresponds to the essential nature of the Supreme Being, which is the same as the essence of Man’s being. It is our unmanifested, unmanifestable, unconditioned Self – That which is the ultimate source of life and consciousness. It is the unseen and unseeable that looks out into the Objective Realm of spirits, thoughts, feelings, and physical phenomena. Continue reading

Amen

AmenThe word amen  (“so be it; truly”) is a declaration of affirmation found in the Bible. Its use in Judaism dates back to its earliest texts. It has been generally adopted in Christian worship as a concluding word for prayers and hymns. In Islam (Arabic: آمين‎, ʾāmīn), it is the standard ending to Dua (supplication). Common English translations of the word amen include “verily” and “truly”. It can also be used to express strong agreement, as in “amen to that“.

Amen is also considered to be a derivative of the name of Continue reading

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