Taken for A Child

http://cinemapasifika.wordpress.com/2010/09/21/the-weird-world-of-huna/

The Huna “Mechanics of Telepathy and Telepathic Prayer”
from The Secret Science Behind Miracles by Max Freedom Long

A. The physical body.
B. The shadowy body pictured as slightly out of the physical body (as in astral travel etc.) but connected with the physical body by a large cord of shadowy body material. Continue reading

Three Dantians

The Taoist Approach of the Three Dantians
By Dr. Te-Hsin Lo & Master Joseph Zeisky

The Taoist approach of the Three Dantians (Elixir fields):

Quite often, when the phrase Dan (elixir) tian (field) is [used], one thinks of the lower Dantian only, an area about three inches below the naval and one inch inside, which also includes the hui yin cavity in the perineum area and the mingmen (gate of life) cavity in the lower back. These three areas/cavities connected together makes-up what is generally referred to as the lower dantian. It is where the Yuan qi resides, where life begins and the physical area that was formerly connected to the heavenly energy.

In Taoist energy arts, there is the concept of the three Dantians; the upper dantian, the middle dantian and the lower dantian. These elixir fields function on a more subtle level than the body’s more physical manifestations such as blood, lymph, muscle, tendons and bone. The Continue reading

Dan Tian

Dantian (dan t’ian, dan tien or tan t’ien) is loosely translated as “elixir field”, “sea of qi”, or simply “energy center”. Dantians are important focal points for meditative and exercise techniques such as qigong, martial arts such as t’ai chi ch’uan, and in traditional Chinese medicine.

The first detailed description of the lower Dantian is in the Laozi zhongjing 老子中經 from the 3rd century CE, it refers to the Cinnabar field where Essence and Spirit are stored, it is related to regeneration and sexual energy, menstruation and semen.

Traditionally, a dantian is considered to be a center of qi or life force energy. The dantians are important points of reference in neidan, qigong, neigong, tao yin, Taoist sexual practices, Reiki and other self-cultivation practices of exercise, breathing, and meditation, as well as in martial arts and in traditional Chinese medicine. Continue reading

Instance of Healing

From Fire-Walking To Instant Healing
From Freedomtek [Edited]

In Hawaii, up to the year 1900, fire-walking was done on overflows of molten lava as soon as they were cooled sufficiently to hold the weight of large stones thrown on them.

Dr. Brigham fire-walked over such a lava bed under the protection of three native priests or kahunas. He refused to remove his heavy boots, [but] during the passage over the lava these were burned from his feet, as were his two pairs of heavy socks. The natives [seemed] pray to the goddess of the volcanoes, Pele.

If instant healing had been known only in Hawaii, there might be an excuse for those who make a flat denial of such a possibility. But, since Dr. Alexis Carrel added his verification in his book, Man the Unknown, there is no longer justification for denial of the basic fact that instant healing is possible. It Continue reading

Dragons and Elements

“There is a devil there is no doubt, but is he trying to get into us or trying to get out?”
~ Tsem Rinpoche

The Dragon and the Five Elements
By Tsem Rinpoche, 2010

The Dragon: A Wood Sign
The Dragon sign is of the Wood element. Generally, Wood bestows an expansive, open characteristic to people born with this element. They find it easy to get along well with others, especially in a group context and bring good, energising vibes to any situation. They are compassionate people, who look for ways to help others and bring justice.

Many Chinese believe that life will be more exciting when a Dragon is born into their family. If there are three Dragons within the family, they believe that they are blessed with incredible luck and prosperity. Continue reading

Gorin of Sho

Gorin-No-Sho
Musashi Miyamoto’s Book of Five Rings

While in reclusion, Miyamoto Musashi wrote the “Go Rin No Sho”, known in English as “The Book Of Five Rings”, which was a text on kenjutsu, martial arts and philosophy.

Many translations of the “Go Rin No Sho” have been made over the years, and it enjoys an audience considerably broader than just those interested in martial arts. For instance, some business leaders find its discussion of conflict and how to take advantage of it to be relevant to their work.

The five “books” refer to the idea that there are different elements of battle, just as there are different physical elements in life, as is believed in Buddhism, Shintoism, and other Eastern religions.

The term “Ichi School”, which is referenced in the Go Rin No Sho, refers to the “Niten No Ichi Ryu”, or “Ni Ten Ichi Ryu”, which when literally translated means “Two Swords, One Heaven”, although the translation could be interpreted as “Two Swords, One Spirit”, or “Two Swords, One Entity”. Continue reading

Five Rings to Godai

Five elements (Japanese philosophy)

The five elements philosophy in Japanese Buddhism, godai (五大?, lit. “five great”), is derived from Indian Vastu shastra philosophy and Buddhist beliefs. It is perhaps best known in the Western world for its use in Miyamoto Musashi’s famous text Gorin-no-sho (The Book of Five Rings), in which he explains different aspects of swordsmanship by assigning each aspect to an element.

The five elements are, in ascending order of power, Earth, Water, Fire, Wind, and Void.

Earth

地 Chi (or ji) or tsuchi, meaning “Earth”, represents the hard, solid objects of the earth. The most basic example of chi is in a stone. Stones are highly resistant to movement or change, as is anything heavily influenced by chi. In people, the bones, muscles and tissues are represented by chi. Emotionally, chi is predominantly associated with stubbornness, collectivity, stability, physicality, and gravity. It is a desire Continue reading

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